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Ziyarat in Madinah

Masjid Al Nabawi

Masjid Al Nabawi

The Green Dome may be seen in the distance behind the Prophet's Mosque in the background. After the Great Mosque of Mecca, it is the second-holiest location in Islam. It is open every day, regardless of the day or hour. The first mosque was an outdoor structure that also served as a community centre, a court, and a school. The location was initially next to Muhammad's home.

The Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques is in charge of the mosque. The mosque is close to numerous hotels and historic markets in the area that was formerly the heart of Medina. It is a significant place of worship. Due of Medina's connection to Muhammad, a large number of pilgrims who complete the Hajj stay there to see the mosque. 

Jannat Al Baqi

Jannat Al Baqi

From the balcony of the Bab Abdulaziz minaret, a contemporary aerial view of the cemetery looking east. As one of the two holiest cemeteries in Islamic tradition, the grounds of al-Baqi' retain great significance for Muslims as many of Muhammad's family and companions are buried there. Asa'ad Bin Zararah was the first person to be interred here after the prophet Muhammad arrived in Medina and the location was designated as a burial ground.

Masjid Quba

Masjid Quba

Prophet Mohammed (peace be upon him) constructed the Quba Mosque, the first mosque in Islam, in 622 AD, the year he moved from Mecca to Yathrib, an event that Muslims consider marking the beginning of the Islamic calendar. It is therefore older than 14 centuries!

This mosque has undergone numerous enlargement and refurbishment projects since Muslim monarchs have always taken care of it. For instance, it was greatly expanded to accommodate the enormous number of tourists during the reign of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Fahd ibn Abd Al-Aziz. As a result, it is now many times larger than its original site. Originally 1,600 m2, the prayer space is now 5,035 m2, and the entire area is 13,500 m2.

The first of the Quba Mosque's four minarets was constructed during the rule of Umar ibn Abd Al-Aziz. The roof is ornamented with exquisite white domes, comprising six large and 56 minor ones, and they are all 47 metres high. A sizable open yard divides the mosque's southern and northern sections, and when necessary, automatic fibreglass parasols built in this yard are raised.

Masjid Qiblatain

Masjid Qiblatain

One of Madinah's most beautiful landmarks is Masjid al-Qiblatayn. The name alludes to the manner in which Mecca's Kaaba replaced Al-Aqsa Mosque as the Qibla (direction of prayer). The Prophet (peace be upon him) was instructed by divine inspiration to perform the final two units of a four-unit prayer in Rajjab, 2 Hijri, facing the Holy Kaaba rather than the Al-Aqsa Mosque. The 3,920 m2 mosque is situated in Madinah's northwest region.

The mosque's structure exhibits the elegance and grandeur of Islamic design; both the exterior and the interior walls are tastefully adorned. In the course of its lengthy existence, it has undergone numerous renovations. First renovated in 87 Hijri/706 AD under the rule of Umar ibn Abd Al-Aziz, it had a second renovation in 893 Hijri/1488 AD under Shaheen Al-Jamali. King Abdulaziz bin Abdul Rahman Al Saud, the country's founder, oversaw its final enlargement and redecoration in 1350 Hijri.

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